thenotoriousscuttlecliff:

Every fandom ever

boromirs:

Kingdoms of Middle-earth + House words

wnderlst:

Ilulissat, Greenland | Gaaba Jensen

wnderlst:

Ilulissat, Greenland | Gaaba Jensen

happydorid:

Tea spirit prints are now available!

ghostparties:

Gerhard Richter

awrrex:

gnarly:

the older I get, the more I understand squidwards anger

You either die Spongebob, or live long enough to see yourself become Squidward.

tagged → #this is fact

thekhooll:

Jad Hak

I need to correct something, I had planned to do a set of Jad’s work a while ago and I got distracted. So, here it is, a small sampling of some of the amazing work by Jad. 

Check out this tumblr!

- Bernard, you can’t survive on the mushrooms in your hair!
- I’m FINE.

tagged → #black books
magicmumu:

thatgreenevening:

ellen page is a tiny apologetic menswear elf and laverne cox is a statuesque queen lifting her award in benediction

This looks like the most amazing prom picture ever.

magicmumu:

thatgreenevening:

ellen page is a tiny apologetic menswear elf and laverne cox is a statuesque queen lifting her award in benediction

This looks like the most amazing prom picture ever.

dynastylnoire:

s0ulonfire:

still crying over foxes over here

pokemon are real

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Histoire de doña Maria d'Avalos et du duc d'Andria' by Anatole France; illustrated and decorated by Léon Lebègue. Published 1902 by Librairie des bibliophiles, Paris.

Description: Maria D’Avalos was an Italian princess during the later part of the Italian Renaissance. She was married to Carlo Gesualdo, one of the noblest men in Naples and a famous musician. But Maria, neglected by her husband, fell in love with another nobleman, don Fabrizio Carafa, with whom she began a love affair. When her husband found out, he pretended to go on a hunting trip but instead he returned that same night and caught them in the act. He murdered them both in their bed and left their mutilated bodies in front of the palace for everyone to see.

See the complete book here.

"What people value in their books—and thus what they count as literature—really tells you more about them than it does about the book."
— Brent Weeks (via quotes-shape-us)